Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current)

Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current)Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current)Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current)Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current)
Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current) Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current) Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current) Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current) 'Spec' Stealth Black 'Spec' Stealth Black
Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current)
Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current)

by Klim
SKU:4053-001-***-***

369

Regular Price: £639.00

Special Price £369.00

Please select product options to get availability

Regular Price: £639.00

Special Price £369.00

  • 32 X
  • 36 X
  • 38 X
  • Black X
  • Stealth Black X
  • regular X

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Regular Price: £639.00

Special Price £369.00

The perfectly prepared partner to the Badlands Jacket and your dream journey, the all-new Badlands Pant provides all-conditions comfort with legendary KLIM® dependability.
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The perfectly prepared partner to the Badlands Jacket and your dream journey, the all-new Badlands Pant provides all-conditions comfort with legendary KLIM® dependability.

Engineered to ride all-day, every day, the Badlands Pant incorporates a matrix of materials designed to fit your riding position and needs seamlessly. From aggressive, over-the-front off-road two-track stages to wide-open asphalt, KLIM® has refined the Badlands for a premium tailored fit across the board.

Robustness comes first from a full suite of D3O™ and PORON® XRD® armor components followed closely by the most abrasion and cut/tear resistant GORE-TEX® fabric technologies available.

 

  • NEW FEATURES:
  • IMPROVED COMFORT AND FIT
  • NEW GORE-TEX® 3-LAYER PRO SHELL MATERIAL ON MAIN BODY REDUCES WEIGHT WITHOUT SACRIFICING DURABILITY/WEATHERPROOFNESS
  • GORE-TEX® 3-LAYER PRO SHELL WITH CORDURA® 840D ON LOWER LEGS FOR INCREASED DURABILITY
  • GORE-TEX® 3-LAYER PRO SHELL TALISMAN SUPERFABRIC® ABRASION-RESISTANT MATERIAL ON KNEES SHRUG OFF ABRASION
  • GORE-TEX® 3-LAYER PRO SHELL ARMACOR™ MATERIAL ON SEAT AREA PROVIDES OUTSTANDING ABRASION AND TEAR RESISTANCE
  • PORON® XRD® PREMIUM IMPACT FOAM TAILBONE COVERAGE.
  • JACKET TO PANT ZIPPER HAS BEEN STANDARDIZED (40CM) WHICH ENABLES YOU TO ZIP DIFFERENT NEW PANTS AND JACKETS TOGETHER
  • TPU MOLDED ZIPPER PULLS
  • VT10 YKK® VISLON® AQUAGARD WATER RESISTANT ZIPPERS
  • VELCRO® ADJUSTMENT AT SIDES OF KNEES TO CINCH DOWN KNEE ARMOR
  • REFINED ARMOR PLACEMENT AND NEW EXTERIOR ADJUSTMENT STRAPS KEEP LIMB ARMOR IN PLACE

    EXTERIOR FEATURES

  • GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY®
  • GORE-TEX® 3-LAYER PRO LAMINATE TECHNOLOGY
  • GORE-TEX® PRO LAMINATES—THE MOST BREATHABLE, MOST DURABLE MOTORSPORTS SHELL CONSTRUCTION AVAILABLE
  • GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY®
  • HIGH-MOBILITY ACTIVE FIT PATTERNING FOR UNMATCHED COMFORT
  • GORE-TEX® 3-LAYER PRO SHELL MATERIAL ON MAIN BODY
  • GORE-TEX® 3-LAYER PRO SHELL WITH CORDURA® 840D ON LOWER LEGS
  • GORE-TEX® 3-LAYER PRO SHELL TALISMAN SUPERFABRIC® ABRASION-RESISTANT MATERIAL ON KNEES
  • GORE-TEX® 3-LAYER PRO SHELL ARMACOR™ MATERIAL ON SEAT
  • SOFT ITALIAN FULL-GRAIN LEATHER INNER KNEE/LOWER LEG EXTERIOR
  • 3M SCOTCHLITE™ INDUSTRIAL GRADE REFLECTIVE MATERIALS ON PANELS AND TRIM FOR INCREASED LOW-LIGHT VISIBILITY
  • STRETCH GUSSET PANELS
  • EMBROIDERED LOGOS

    INTEGRATED ARMOR SYSTEM

  • D3O™ T5 EVO PRO XT HIP AND KNEE PIECES INCLUDED (EXCEED LEVEL 1 CE CERTIFICATION FOR PREN1621-1:2011 TESTING)
  • PORON® XRD® TAILBONE COVERAGE
  • VELCRO® ADJUSTMENT AT SIDES OF KNEES TO CINCH DOWN KNEE ARMOR

    CARGO, COMFORT AND SUPPORT SYSTEMS

  • 2 EXTERNAL POCKETS* (2 MID-THIGH CARGO)
  • SIDE WAIST ADJUSTMENT STRAPS
  • MESH COMFORT LINER
  • OVER-THE-BOOT ADJUSTABLE BOOT CUFF WITH ZIPPERED EXPANSION PANEL AND CUSTOM K SNAP CLOSURES
  • RUBBER COATED BUTTONS
  • UPDATED VT10 YKK® VISLON® AQUAGARD WATER RESISTANT ZIPPERS
  • VELCRO ADJUSTERS AND ELASTIC PANEL AT WAIST
  • HIGH-BACK ELASTIC WAIST

    MAX FLOW VENTILATION: 4 PORTS

  • 2 UPPER-THIGH INTAKES
  • 2 REAR LEG EXHAUSTS
Questions

Questions on Klim Badlands Pant Black (Non Current)

  • From Lukasz at 23/04/2016 11:27
    • Do you think those pants will fit with Forma Adventure boots?
    • They should fit over those OK.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No

Ask Your Own Question






Reviews (3)

Customer Reviews

Is it lightweight? No. Compact? Not at all. The pants aren’t dainty or delicate in anyway, and that's exactly why I like them... Review by Two Wheeled Nomad
Is it lightweight? No. Compact? Not at all. The pants aren’t dainty or delicate in anyway, and that's exactly why I like them..." by , written on 18 September 2016
As a company, KLIM is an interesting and compelling organization, the structure of their offering built on the personal passions of the founders and a talented team of product designers. Every product is deliberate and measured, a balance of material quality, functional design and understated style. Much like the ethos, KLIM products are about clarity of purpose. For KLIM, the product must speak for itself.

Appraisal
Even the name of the suit implies serious intent, so throughout the testing I was particularly critical of this product being appropriate for harsh and extreme environments. I evaluated the suit from the perspective of a full time moto-traveller. Given that I had a limited testing window of a few months, I used the suit for back-to-back adventures into the wildernesses of Canada and Alaska, riding through high mountain regions, temperate rainforests and alpine tundra. During my time over 8,000 miles in the suit, I experienced days of non-stop gusting wind, torrential rain, and lashings of wet calcium chloride. I was fortunate to experience everything from sub-freezing to 36ºC with the suit, the all-weather performance proving to be one of the product’s greatest strengths.

At 8ºC and below, I needed to add a merino wool base layer and fleece for additional warmth. For the pants, I donned a wool pant and closed all the venting. In extremely cold weather on a motorcycle, I always look for the draughts, and this suit had refreshingly few. Like many adventurous motorcycle riders, I welcome the colder months, daring unpleasant weather as it comes, but only when cocooned in appropriate gear. For me, that means Gore-Tex. The advent of Gore-Tex Pro, ideal for use in motorcycle applications, has become the gold standard of weather thwarting layers.

One of the Badland’s most valuable features is the Gore-Tex 3-layer pro shell material, which proved to be 100% weatherproof. I also appreciate the zip-together feature, which allows me to connect the rear of the pants and jacket together via a large zipper (a standardized one of 40cm, enabling users to join different new pants with jackets), eliminating draughts at the back from both the bike and traffic turbulence. The tail of the jacket is sufficiently long to provide coverage, even during a full tuck at high speeds.

The pants were perfectly windproof and no draughts were noted. For the jacket, there is only one area susceptible to draughts, namely the collar that errs on the short side. There’s no storm collar, so it’s not capable of pulling snug around the neck. Because the collar lacks height, I found draughts to be noticeable at cold temperatures. To compensate, I started using a separate wool neck gaiter that went from the top of the shoulders to the inside of the helmet.

On my way back to Canmore, Alberta from Prince Rupert, BC in Canada I hit three days of rain, starting with autumnal showers and near-freezing rain the farther north I progressed. I rode for hours at a time in non-stop wet, from road spray to the deluge from above. From this experience, I can vouch that the suit prevents water ingress; no drop was permitted entry. My base layers never got damp, and impressively, neither did the contents in my pockets. It absolutely lives up to its claim: “Guaranteed to keep you dry.”

Jackets that require waterproof liners never work well in the real world. You have to stop every time the weather changes to remove or add rain barriers, and you need to find some place to store the layer. The internal water resistant liners are the most ridiculous, the jacket becomes soaked (and heavy), so once the sun comes back out and you remove the waterproof liner, then you are soaked. Layers that go on the outside are only slightly more tolerable, but they lack the durability of the primary jacket and still need to be removed and stored. With the Badlands jacket, all I needed to do was zip up the vents (which I could do while riding) for the rain, then unzip the vents when the sun came back out (also possible while riding). In a variety of climates, this is the only way to ride.

Off roading
A true adventure suit needs to compliment the rider in the dirt, allowing freedom of movement, ventilation and sufficient protection. The padding cannot be bulky (restricting motion), but needs to take the frequent spills that come with heavy bikes in technical terrain. The protection afforded by the Badlands suit is first-rate, and I’d argue better in some respects than competing ADV options.

The CE-certified level 1 and level 2 pads are flexible, soft, have excellent ventilation properties, and add a minimum of bulk. For instance, D30 T5 Evo Pro XT is provided in all the high impact areas such as the shoulders, elbows, hip and knee part way down the shin (with Velcro adjustment at the sides of the knees to cinch down). Furthermore, there’s a D30 Viper Pro Back piece, which is pliable and enjoys full coverage as well as comfort in all temperatures.

Additionally, there’s a siliconized spacer mesh front, which constitutes the chest armour; although a minor point, the white outer mesh becomes grubby the moment you look at it. This should have stayed black like its predecessor. There’s even Poron XRD tailbone coverage, alongside a removable and adjustable kidney belt jacket-stabilizing support system to boot. Two nice touches, the latter of which also helps keep the jacket from flagging at high speed.

D3O is temperature stable and exceeds level two protection for transmitted force (impact). Range of motion is excellent, an attribute that I tested on my BMW F800GS on the Dempster Highway, veering off on local trails, pushing speed and difficulty to gauge any movement restrictions. Fortunately, adjustments are generous, and I could loosen the waist and arms as required. Ventilation is also critical in the dirt, as this typically requires being on the pegs, operating at higher activity levels and often travelling at lower than highway speeds (less airflow).

Fortunately, the Badlands has tackled its airflow capacity with one glorious ventilation system. Namely with: two sizable chest vents, two on the side, two biceps and two forearm intake vents, all of which can be opened or closed while riding. Heat is exhausted via two vertical back vents. The pants boast maximum ventilation flow with two upper-thigh intakes and two rear leg exhausts that again, are easily accessible at speed. Even at 30ºC and riding hard, I was pleased with the cooling capacity of the suit and comforted knowing that the pads would stay in place by the adjustable armour pockets.

Living with the suit
The reality of constant motorcycle travel is that small details matter. Astride two wheels, there are few conveniences and even less storage space, so everything must have a place, including items stored in the jacket. Pockets on the Badlands are outstanding, so much so I often have to think about where I stowed something. Where to start? There’s seven external pockets: two chest, two waist (both well placed and if left unzipped, will not dump their contents when the rider assumes a seated position), a spot pocket on the left chest, ID/licence pocket on left forearm and one large cargo pocket on exterior back. How considerate.

That’s just on the outside. Internally and easily accessible, there’s: four pockets with one hidden interior passport pocket (two zippered, two mesh stash and one hidden). In addition to all that, there’s a waterproof pouch in the hidden left chest pocket and hydration bladder compartment with an internal hose route (bladder is not included).

The pants feature many of the attributes of the upper including highly articulated and reinforced joints.
For sure, they have many of the same build features of the jacket with the addition of leather patches on the inner knee area where there’s two external pockets comprising mid-thigh cargo storage. A small chest pocket is perfect for earplugs. I keep my multi-tool in the main hand warming pockets. The inside pockets are a good place to keep copies of the motorcycle documents and spare camera batteries. Although the outer fabrics are stiff as the proverbial board when new, they do soften gradually with use. After 500 miles in the two-piece, it finally started to relent and has become more comfortable with each ride. A growing increase in its suppleness made it feel less bulky and in turn––less hot.

An American fit, the jacket is available in Small through to 3X and the pants—shaped a little like jodhpurs due to the large pockets and venting on the upper thighs—in regular or tall. Mindfully, the suit still comes with plenty of cinch straps, adjusters, zip and Velcro fasteners—all of which achieve an optimal fit. Colour options include plain black, black with light grey panelling or hi-vis. Aesthetically, I prefer the all black.

Unlike many suits in this price range, the Badlands does not include additional insulation liners, something I find refreshing. I have a wardrobe full of liners and layers, so not having them add to the price of an already expensive suit was fine by me. Indeed, there are a few other worthwhile mentions on the jacket and pants, which include the oh-so-refreshing additional venting ports (14 in total!) that collectively import more air than expected and the stretch gusset panels (trust me). I can never seem to get knee pads to fall in the right position for my inseam, but these pants solve that.

All of the YKK zippers are weatherproof, easy to actuate, and don’t easily clog or jam when inundated with dust and grime. The final pieces of pleasantry are the hypalon headphone access port, a host of storm flaps, numerous snap back features, soft touch materials around the neck and wrist for a comfortable interface with bare skin, as well as to seal out the weather. What’s more, the jacket comes with a shortened wrist gaiter for increased comfort—how civilized. Not to mention the TPU zipper pulls, pocket flap grips and zipper garages.

Final thoughts
Any motorcycle suit worth its salt today seems to be made of multiple Gore-Tex layers, a top tier fabric that can offer superb protection and features. Although only a select few are as well designed and constructed. To me, the Badlands is up there in KLIM’s flagship offerings made with a selection of cutting edge materials in a jacket designed for four-season capabilities. It provides some of the most complex safety features I’ve seen packaged in a jacket and pant combo.

Pulling the ensemble out of the box for the first time, I could not have been more impressed with the quality of materials and construction. The aesthetic is also eye catching in its ruggedness. I’m a little tired of the space suit appearance, and the Badlands is a sharp looking suit. After riding in this combination for 8,000 miles, I can confirm it is without question, the most comfortable suit I have worn to date.

There are many things I like about this suit, with only a few minor reservations. Crash protection is phenomenally better than average and the way it articulates on the bike supports aggressive riding. The Badlands is well designed, eschewing bright colors in favour of the ultimate adventure style. While aesthetics are important, I am most impressed by the function of the jacket and pants; comfortable in a wide range of temperatures and fully weather sealed without a liner or additional shell. Although it may not cut it on the collar for draught prevention, I can guarantee it will still keep you warm and dry when ugly weather intersects with your route.

Air pass-through is unparalleled and moves air throughout the entire suit. Even down to freezing temperatures, the jacket requires few warm baselayers. This is a supremely technical, fully featured piece designed for a lifetime of hard use. Be that for the serious competition enduro riders to the sport tourers to the pavement motorcyclists, thanks to abrasion-resistant Armacor panels.

As grandiose as it sounds, this really is about as nice and indestructible as motorcycle suits get. At £895 for the jacket and £639 for the pants, the premium purchase price is a bitter pill, but chances are high that this will be the last motorcycle suit you ever need to buy. As I ended my mid-term evaluation of this suit, my thoughts immediately drifted to this question: “If I were to leave the Americas tomorrow for a trip farther afield, would I wear the Badlands?” The answer is yes, and Africa seems like a good spot to write the long-term review.

Pros
• Rugged design, heavy duty construction and materials throughout.
• Wide temperature range through use of excellent ventilation.
• A comfortable American fit affording maximum mobility on and off road.
• Weather sealed—shedding the need for waterproof liners / over-suits.
• High performance shock absorption from a comprehensive D30 Evo / Viper Pro offering.
• Superb storage.
Cons
• No women’s specific equivalent.
Overall rating
5 out of 5
As a company, KLIM is an interesting and compelling organization, the structure of their offering built on the personal passions of the founders and a talented team of product designers. Every product is deliberate and measured, a balance of material quality, functional design and understated style. Much like the ethos, KLIM products are about clarity of purpose. For KLIM, the product must speak for itself.

Appraisal
Even the name of the suit implies serious intent, so throughout the testing I was particularly critical of this product being appropriate for harsh and extreme environments. I evaluated the suit from the perspective of a full time moto-traveller. Given that I had a limited testing window of a few months, I used the suit for back-to-back adventures into the wildernesses of Canada and Alaska, riding through high mountain regions, temperate rainforests and alpine tundra. During my time over 8,000 miles in the suit, I experienced days of non-stop gusting wind, torrential rain, and lashings of wet calcium chloride. I was fortunate to experience everything from sub-freezing to 36ºC with the suit, the all-weather performance proving to be one of the product’s greatest strengths.

At 8ºC and below, I needed to add a merino wool base layer and fleece for additional warmth. For the pants, I donned a wool pant and closed all the venting. In extremely cold weather on a motorcycle, I always look for the draughts, and this suit had refreshingly few. Like many adventurous motorcycle riders, I welcome the colder months, daring unpleasant weather as it comes, but only when cocooned in appropriate gear. For me, that means Gore-Tex. The advent of Gore-Tex Pro, ideal for use in motorcycle applications, has become the gold standard of weather thwarting layers.

One of the Badland’s most valuable features is the Gore-Tex 3-layer pro shell material, which proved to be 100% weatherproof. I also appreciate the zip-together feature, which allows me to connect the rear of the pants and jacket together via a large zipper (a standardized one of 40cm, enabling users to join different new pants with jackets), eliminating draughts at the back from both the bike and traffic turbulence. The tail of the jacket is sufficiently long to provide coverage, even during a full tuck at high speeds.

The pants were perfectly windproof and no draughts were noted. For the jacket, there is only one area susceptible to draughts, namely the collar that errs on the short side. There’s no storm collar, so it’s not capable of pulling snug around the neck. Because the collar lacks height, I found draughts to be noticeable at cold temperatures. To compensate, I started using a separate wool neck gaiter that went from the top of the shoulders to the inside of the helmet.

On my way back to Canmore, Alberta from Prince Rupert, BC in Canada I hit three days of rain, starting with autumnal showers and near-freezing rain the farther north I progressed. I rode for hours at a time in non-stop wet, from road spray to the deluge from above. From this experience, I can vouch that the suit prevents water ingress; no drop was permitted entry. My base layers never got damp, and impressively, neither did the contents in my pockets. It absolutely lives up to its claim: “Guaranteed to keep you dry.”

Jackets that require waterproof liners never work well in the real world. You have to stop every time the weather changes to remove or add rain barriers, and you need to find some place to store the layer. The internal water resistant liners are the most ridiculous, the jacket becomes soaked (and heavy), so once the sun comes back out and you remove the waterproof liner, then you are soaked. Layers that go on the outside are only slightly more tolerable, but they lack the durability of the primary jacket and still need to be removed and stored. With the Badlands jacket, all I needed to do was zip up the vents (which I could do while riding) for the rain, then unzip the vents when the sun came back out (also possible while riding). In a variety of climates, this is the only way to ride.

Off roading
A true adventure suit needs to compliment the rider in the dirt, allowing freedom of movement, ventilation and sufficient protection. The padding cannot be bulky (restricting motion), but needs to take the frequent spills that come with heavy bikes in technical terrain. The protection afforded by the Badlands suit is first-rate, and I’d argue better in some respects than competing ADV options.

The CE-certified level 1 and level 2 pads are flexible, soft, have excellent ventilation properties, and add a minimum of bulk. For instance, D30 T5 Evo Pro XT is provided in all the high impact areas such as the shoulders, elbows, hip and knee part way down the shin (with Velcro adjustment at the sides of the knees to cinch down). Furthermore, there’s a D30 Viper Pro Back piece, which is pliable and enjoys full coverage as well as comfort in all temperatures.

Additionally, there’s a siliconized spacer mesh front, which constitutes the chest armour; although a minor point, the white outer mesh becomes grubby the moment you look at it. This should have stayed black like its predecessor. There’s even Poron XRD tailbone coverage, alongside a removable and adjustable kidney belt jacket-stabilizing support system to boot. Two nice touches, the latter of which also helps keep the jacket from flagging at high speed.

D3O is temperature stable and exceeds level two protection for transmitted force (impact). Range of motion is excellent, an attribute that I tested on my BMW F800GS on the Dempster Highway, veering off on local trails, pushing speed and difficulty to gauge any movement restrictions. Fortunately, adjustments are generous, and I could loosen the waist and arms as required. Ventilation is also critical in the dirt, as this typically requires being on the pegs, operating at higher activity levels and often travelling at lower than highway speeds (less airflow).

Fortunately, the Badlands has tackled its airflow capacity with one glorious ventilation system. Namely with: two sizable chest vents, two on the side, two biceps and two forearm intake vents, all of which can be opened or closed while riding. Heat is exhausted via two vertical back vents. The pants boast maximum ventilation flow with two upper-thigh intakes and two rear leg exhausts that again, are easily accessible at speed. Even at 30ºC and riding hard, I was pleased with the cooling capacity of the suit and comforted knowing that the pads would stay in place by the adjustable armour pockets.

Living with the suit
The reality of constant motorcycle travel is that small details matter. Astride two wheels, there are few conveniences and even less storage space, so everything must have a place, including items stored in the jacket. Pockets on the Badlands are outstanding, so much so I often have to think about where I stowed something. Where to start? There’s seven external pockets: two chest, two waist (both well placed and if left unzipped, will not dump their contents when the rider assumes a seated position), a spot pocket on the left chest, ID/licence pocket on left forearm and one large cargo pocket on exterior back. How considerate.

That’s just on the outside. Internally and easily accessible, there’s: four pockets with one hidden interior passport pocket (two zippered, two mesh stash and one hidden). In addition to all that, there’s a waterproof pouch in the hidden left chest pocket and hydration bladder compartment with an internal hose route (bladder is not included).

The pants feature many of the attributes of the upper including highly articulated and reinforced joints.
For sure, they have many of the same build features of the jacket with the addition of leather patches on the inner knee area where there’s two external pockets comprising mid-thigh cargo storage. A small chest pocket is perfect for earplugs. I keep my multi-tool in the main hand warming pockets. The inside pockets are a good place to keep copies of the motorcycle documents and spare camera batteries. Although the outer fabrics are stiff as the proverbial board when new, they do soften gradually with use. After 500 miles in the two-piece, it finally started to relent and has become more comfortable with each ride. A growing increase in its suppleness made it feel less bulky and in turn––less hot.

An American fit, the jacket is available in Small through to 3X and the pants—shaped a little like jodhpurs due to the large pockets and venting on the upper thighs—in regular or tall. Mindfully, the suit still comes with plenty of cinch straps, adjusters, zip and Velcro fasteners—all of which achieve an optimal fit. Colour options include plain black, black with light grey panelling or hi-vis. Aesthetically, I prefer the all black.

Unlike many suits in this price range, the Badlands does not include additional insulation liners, something I find refreshing. I have a wardrobe full of liners and layers, so not having them add to the price of an already expensive suit was fine by me. Indeed, there are a few other worthwhile mentions on the jacket and pants, which include the oh-so-refreshing additional venting ports (14 in total!) that collectively import more air than expected and the stretch gusset panels (trust me). I can never seem to get knee pads to fall in the right position for my inseam, but these pants solve that.

All of the YKK zippers are weatherproof, easy to actuate, and don’t easily clog or jam when inundated with dust and grime. The final pieces of pleasantry are the hypalon headphone access port, a host of storm flaps, numerous snap back features, soft touch materials around the neck and wrist for a comfortable interface with bare skin, as well as to seal out the weather. What’s more, the jacket comes with a shortened wrist gaiter for increased comfort—how civilized. Not to mention the TPU zipper pulls, pocket flap grips and zipper garages.

Final thoughts
Any motorcycle suit worth its salt today seems to be made of multiple Gore-Tex layers, a top tier fabric that can offer superb protection and features. Although only a select few are as well designed and constructed. To me, the Badlands is up there in KLIM’s flagship offerings made with a selection of cutting edge materials in a jacket designed for four-season capabilities. It provides some of the most complex safety features I’ve seen packaged in a jacket and pant combo.

Pulling the ensemble out of the box for the first time, I could not have been more impressed with the quality of materials and construction. The aesthetic is also eye catching in its ruggedness. I’m a little tired of the space suit appearance, and the Badlands is a sharp looking suit. After riding in this combination for 8,000 miles, I can confirm it is without question, the most comfortable suit I have worn to date.

There are many things I like about this suit, with only a few minor reservations. Crash protection is phenomenally better than average and the way it articulates on the bike supports aggressive riding. The Badlands is well designed, eschewing bright colors in favour of the ultimate adventure style. While aesthetics are important, I am most impressed by the function of the jacket and pants; comfortable in a wide range of temperatures and fully weather sealed without a liner or additional shell. Although it may not cut it on the collar for draught prevention, I can guarantee it will still keep you warm and dry when ugly weather intersects with your route.

Air pass-through is unparalleled and moves air throughout the entire suit. Even down to freezing temperatures, the jacket requires few warm baselayers. This is a supremely technical, fully featured piece designed for a lifetime of hard use. Be that for the serious competition enduro riders to the sport tourers to the pavement motorcyclists, thanks to abrasion-resistant Armacor panels.

As grandiose as it sounds, this really is about as nice and indestructible as motorcycle suits get. At £895 for the jacket and £639 for the pants, the premium purchase price is a bitter pill, but chances are high that this will be the last motorcycle suit you ever need to buy. As I ended my mid-term evaluation of this suit, my thoughts immediately drifted to this question: “If I were to leave the Americas tomorrow for a trip farther afield, would I wear the Badlands?” The answer is yes, and Africa seems like a good spot to write the long-term review.

Pros
• Rugged design, heavy duty construction and materials throughout.
• Wide temperature range through use of excellent ventilation.
• A comfortable American fit affording maximum mobility on and off road.
• Weather sealed—shedding the need for waterproof liners / over-suits.
• High performance shock absorption from a comprehensive D30 Evo / Viper Pro offering.
• Superb storage.
Cons
• No women’s specific equivalent. (Posted on 18/09/2016)
Worth every penny brilliant trousers Review by Clappo
Worth every penny brilliant trousers " by , written on 11 November 2015
I had these new badlands pants as my old ones had a slight leek , I have got to say I find these pants much better fit than the old ones ,with the adjustment u can do on each leg , the ventilation zips are easy to use while riding if u stand up , the first real ride in bad weather was for 4 hours , then stood for 2 hours waiting for a ferry , not a single leek , and with the matching jacket u feel u can tackle any weather , As for the cost I think it was the best investment I've made as I think I will have years of riding in them .
Overall rating
5 out of 5
I had these new badlands pants as my old ones had a slight leek , I have got to say I find these pants much better fit than the old ones ,with the adjustment u can do on each leg , the ventilation zips are easy to use while riding if u stand up , the first real ride in bad weather was for 4 hours , then stood for 2 hours waiting for a ferry , not a single leek , and with the matching jacket u feel u can tackle any weather , As for the cost I think it was the best investment I've made as I think I will have years of riding in them . (Posted on 11/11/2015)
Hold on to the old badlands Pro Review by Don
Hold on to the old badlands Pro" by , written on 12 August 2015
I originally bought the Badlands Pro based on a review stating that you can wear them over a pair of Sidi Crossfire boots.

When I bought these I expected the same functionality but with perhaps better protection.

After wearing it this past weekend I was utterly dismayed. The old Badlands Pro could be pulled over said boots without even undoing the zip. They had enough space in the knee area for standalone knee armour or knee braces and you could even wear a pair of padded undershorts under them.

With the new badlands I was unable to pull them over my boots. I then unzipped them and they went over. But then I was unable to pull the zip down even less than a third!

Worse, even with the zip fully undone, I was unable to pull them far enough down over my boots because it got stuck at the top part of where the zip starts when fully unzipped.

The effect of this was that the armour was not positioned well and was too far up my upper leg! I have a massive bruise right under my left knee after falling off where the armour should have protected me but it didn't.

Also the pants was ultra tight over the knees and even when I was wearing my Sidi Adventure boots over which they can slide. So tight it would be impossible to wear any other knee protection than that which it comes with.

And it is very tight over my upper legs. I wore a size 32" and my middle is 30" and I'm very athletic built.

The material also feels odd, hard to describe but it almost makes me think of the material you would use for a ground cover.

Basically if like me you bought the old badlands pro for enduro riding and to wear with perhaps your own knee protection and over motocross boots don't bother with these.

They have been restyled by Klim to now be more road orientated in my view.

They are so bad, that I am planning on buying an old Badlands Pro pants from adventure spec and then I will hope to be able to sell my new badlands after just two uses on ebay I guess...

If you are a road rider, then you may like it, if you want to travel around the world and do enduros with extra protection as said. Forget about it. Perhaps this is Klim's way to force those that wants that to buy the adventure pants.....

I have to conclude by saying the old was much better.

*** Adventure Spec Comment - A really interesting review, thanks for taking the time to write it. You are right on a number of counts. The New Badlands Pant does not work with MotoX boots as it is a tighter fit than the previous version, leaning more towards an Adventure role than Enduro (for Enduro use with external armour/knee braces we'd recommend the Traverse/Overland pant). However, I ride a new 32" Badlands Pant and they fit perfectly with Sidi Adventure Boots and my calves are not small. Your conclusion that the old pant was much better could perhaps be re-phrased. The new pant is different and focussed more towards people who are happy with the fitted armour and want a slightly tighter fitting leg. They are a much better Adventure Pant than ever before, but as a result of that focus have lost some flexibility and are not really suited to enduro use***
Overall rating
1 out of 5
I originally bought the Badlands Pro based on a review stating that you can wear them over a pair of Sidi Crossfire boots.

When I bought these I expected the same functionality but with perhaps better protection.

After wearing it this past weekend I was utterly dismayed. The old Badlands Pro could be pulled over said boots without even undoing the zip. They had enough space in the knee area for standalone knee armour or knee braces and you could even wear a pair of padded undershorts under them.

With the new badlands I was unable to pull them over my boots. I then unzipped them and they went over. But then I was unable to pull the zip down even less than a third!

Worse, even with the zip fully undone, I was unable to pull them far enough down over my boots because it got stuck at the top part of where the zip starts when fully unzipped.

The effect of this was that the armour was not positioned well and was too far up my upper leg! I have a massive bruise right under my left knee after falling off where the armour should have protected me but it didn't.

Also the pants was ultra tight over the knees and even when I was wearing my Sidi Adventure boots over which they can slide. So tight it would be impossible to wear any other knee protection than that which it comes with.

And it is very tight over my upper legs. I wore a size 32" and my middle is 30" and I'm very athletic built.

The material also feels odd, hard to describe but it almost makes me think of the material you would use for a ground cover.

Basically if like me you bought the old badlands pro for enduro riding and to wear with perhaps your own knee protection and over motocross boots don't bother with these.

They have been restyled by Klim to now be more road orientated in my view.

They are so bad, that I am planning on buying an old Badlands Pro pants from adventure spec and then I will hope to be able to sell my new badlands after just two uses on ebay I guess...

If you are a road rider, then you may like it, if you want to travel around the world and do enduros with extra protection as said. Forget about it. Perhaps this is Klim's way to force those that wants that to buy the adventure pants.....

I have to conclude by saying the old was much better.

*** Adventure Spec Comment - A really interesting review, thanks for taking the time to write it. You are right on a number of counts. The New Badlands Pant does not work with MotoX boots as it is a tighter fit than the previous version, leaning more towards an Adventure role than Enduro (for Enduro use with external armour/knee braces we'd recommend the Traverse/Overland pant). However, I ride a new 32" Badlands Pant and they fit perfectly with Sidi Adventure Boots and my calves are not small. Your conclusion that the old pant was much better could perhaps be re-phrased. The new pant is different and focussed more towards people who are happy with the fitted armour and want a slightly tighter fitting leg. They are a much better Adventure Pant than ever before, but as a result of that focus have lost some flexibility and are not really suited to enduro use*** (Posted on 12/08/2015)

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